Monthly Archives: March 2014

Blind

BlindDate: March 23, 2014
Author: Rose Barbour
Source: Shadowsinpei.blogspot.ca

 
Through sobs and tears
She kisses her son good-bye
In a hospital bed, she leaves his body behind
The pain is so great she’s losing her mind.

Good-bye sweet child
My boy in blue
You were everything to me
How will I go on without you?

Gone forever this gentle boy
Whose sparkling eyes were once filled with joy
But over the years they hollowed out
As he became a shell of his former self.

Each day, she put on a smile to hide the pain
Of a disease so painful it can’t be explained
She sat in agony each and every night
Wondering if her boy was doing alright.

Was he being cared for with a gentle hand?
Did anyone love her special man?
Would he meet a fate worse than death?
Would he be alone when he took his last breath?

Oh how she missed her boy, who he once was
That little boy so full of love
That band student playing an instrument so big
Smiling from ear to ear at every gig.

The beautiful cards he lovingly made
The flowers he picked on a summer’s day
That caring boy who made no waves
Was now a man she couldn’t save.

Though she did try to make it right
To give him hope to keep up the fight
He got sicker each day and lost his will
As he sought relief from another pill.

Addiction is cruel and has a high cost
Please pray for the moms who have loved and lost
They couldn’t save their children, though they did try
With broken hearts they wondered why, why, why.

Feeling alone in the crowd, she puts flowers on his grave
Saying one last good-bye as her tears came in waves
Who could understand this loss of a boy so kind
When the symptoms of the disease made people blind.

Blind to the person he was inside
Blind to the tears he cried at night
Blind to the way he hated himself
Blind to the way he truly felt.

Rest easy dear son you are now at peace
You are free of the chains that caused you grief
As for me, I am heartbroken and don’t want go on
But I will remember the happy times and try to be strong.

Love always, mom

Andy Flynn

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Submitted by: Caroline Flynn (twin sister)
Born: 1967
Died: 2014
My Tribute: Andy will live in my heart forever. He was a man of much love and kindness. His tender soul was taken over by heroine, it masked his childhood trauma and in many ways kept him alive, but his mask took him. I want to believe there is a heaven for someone as beautiful as he, and I can only pray he is living the life he was denied as a child. May his wonderful soul rejoice in the freedom he so richly deserved.
This pain is overwhelming,, with so many regrets, I hated his addiction but never him. He was so kind and humble. I want him back, I wish him in my arms every day, but I know he is now free and I have to remain focused on that. He wasn't just a heroine user, he was a proud man, that loved, that gave, that shared, that cared, that fought for his freedom... In man ways I am glad god has intervened and taken his tired wee soul.
I will live in his legacy of success and can only dream t be the man he was, he was forgiving, an amazing father, an amazing brother, friend, partner.
Andy you left an incredible memory to all those that new you...
May your soul be safe, warm and rested....I look forward to seeing you again my darling brother x x x

Support group to start in R.I.

Siana WoodDate: March 8, 2014
Author: Felice J. Freyer
Source: Providence Journal

 When Siana Wood’s younger brother died at the age of 35, many of her friends offered no condolences, only silence. When she returned to work after two weeks’ leave, a couple of her coworkers wondered why she was even upset.

Whatever could prompt such coldness in the face of terrible loss? Only one thing: the way her brother died, and the judgments that sort of death elicits.

Wood’s brother, David Collyer, died of a drug overdose — a combination of alcohol and opiates.

To Read the Entire Article, Click Here

 

Moms Taking Action to Save Lives

Grethchen BergmanDate: March 13, 2014
Author: Gretchen Burns Bergman
Source: Huffpost Healthy Living

Every day, 105 people are dying in the United States due to an accidental overdose. This is a tragedy of epic proportions!

Despite over 40 years of failed drug policy and billions of dollars wasted on waging a war on drugs, overdose deaths continue to increase. One might argue that these punitive policies actually contributed to the rise in these tragic deaths, because of the stigmatization and criminalization of people who use drugs or who are addicted to drugs. Overdose is now our country's leading cause of injury death for people 25 to 64, more than vehicular accidents.

To Read the Entire Article, Click here

Losing my son to drugs

Diannee Carden GlennDate: March 2, 2014
Author: Diannee Carden Glenn
Source: Salon.com

The death of my child brought a pain like no other, and made me question every parenting decision I've made.

A reporter called to interview me about my son’s death and my subsequent advocacy for overdose prevention. She asked the usual questions: How old was he when he died, when did he start to use, would Naloxone have saved his life. And then she asked a question no one had ever asked before. What is it like to lose a child to overdose?

To Read the Entire Article, Click Here.

Kyle Edward Mercer

White-Tux
Submitted by: Michael E. Mercer
Born: 1993
Died: 2014
My Tribute: Our son Kyle was a truly loving soul. He lost his brother Ricky to Heroin 8 years ago when he was 12.
We will honor his love and always carry his smile and genuine personality, for the rest of our lives on the face of this Earth. Our prayers go out to all Mom's and Dad's, Brother's, Sister's, Children and Family and Friends who have lost a wonderful person in their lives because of this terrible disease. Rest in Peace son!
We love and honor your memories, each and every moment of each and every day! God Bless.

A Hard Truth to GRASP: A Mother’s Story

ZacharyDate: February, 2014
Author: Rhea Rosier
Source: Wicked Sober

Zachary died on July 19th, 2013, due to a drug overdose. Not because he was a junkie or because he was an addict. Because he wasn’t just an addict. He was a son, a brother, a human being with love in his heart, and goals for the future. He died of a drug overdose because he had a disease, leaving a family behind to pick up the pieces and to figure out, what next?

Zachary isn’t around to tell his story, but the one person who probably knew him better than anyone else is, his mom. And this is her story. This is a mother’s, Louise’s, experience, strength and hope.

To Read the Entire Story, Click Here